Which clinical history findings are characteristic of migraine-associated vertigo?

Updated: Jun 17, 2021
  • Author: Aaron G Benson, MD; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA  more...
  • Print
Answer

Answer

As with any type of dizziness evaluation, the history is the most important means to diagnose migraine-associated vertigo. [1, 22, 23] Patients with migraine-related vestibulopathy typically experience a varied range of dizzy symptoms throughout their life and even within individual attacks. [2, 22] These symptoms may be solitary or may be a combination of vertigo, lightheadedness, and imbalance.

A thorough headache history is also important when evaluating patients for possible migraine-associated vertigo. Many patients with recurrent headaches are unaware that their headaches may be from migraine. Therefore, the examining physician should have a thorough knowledge of the strict diagnostic criteria for migraine diagnosis.

A study by Bruss et al found that in persons with recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, those with migraine headache and those without did not show a statistically significant difference in the rate at which the majority of migraine-related symptoms in the study occurred. The investigators stated that these results may indicate a link between recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and migraine and suggested that this form of vertigo may be a manifestation of otologic migraine. [24]


Did this answer your question?
Additional feedback? (Optional)
Thank you for your feedback!