What is opioid toxicity?

Updated: Jul 19, 2021
  • Author: Everett Stephens, MD; Chief Editor: Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD  more...
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Answer

Pain is arguably the most common reason why patients seek treatment, especially in the emergency department (ED). The modern physician wields many tools to relieve pain, the most potent of which are opioids. The term narcotic specifically refers to any substance that induces sleep, insensibility, or stupor, and it is used to refer to opioids or opioid derivatives. It is derived from the Greek "narke" that means "numbness or torpor." It is common, however inaccurate, that the public uses the term narcotics for any illicit psychoactive substance.

In cultivation since approximately 1500 BC, pure opium is a mixture of alkaloids extracted from the sap of unripened seedpods of Papaver somniferum (poppy). Opiates, such as heroin, codeine, or morphine, are natural derivatives of these alkaloids. The term opiate is often used (albeit slightly incorrectly) to refer to synthetic opiate derivatives, such as oxycodone, as well as true opiates.

Opioids constitute a notable percentage of total overdoses encountered in the ED and they merit particular attention because of the potential mortality/morbidity they cause when unrecognized and untreated, as well as the relative ease of reversing their effects. The notable prevalence of opioids in current prescribing patterns, as well as recreational uses, mandates that physicians maintain a high index of suspicion when treating the patient who is unconscious for unknown reasons.

From 2002 through 2010, prescriptions for opioid analgesics, rates of opioid diversion and abuse, and opioid-related deaths increased significantly in the United States. All three plateaued or decreased from 2011 through 2013. [7, 8] From 2013 to 2014, however, rates of opioid overdose deaths increased 14%, from 7.9 to 9.0 per 100,000 population. [8] The number of fatal drug overdoses involving opioids declined from 47,600 in 2017 to 46,800 in 2018. [9]

The increase in opioid use, and thus in overdoses, may have been an unintended consequence of attempts to address the problem of undertreated pain (eg, designating pain as "the fifth vital sign"). [10] In response, the medical profession, licensing agencies, and federal enforcement have been increasingly focusing on prescribing practices for short- and long-term use of narcotic substances. In addition, legislation to create prescription-drug monitoring programs has been enacted in 49 states [11] (eg, Kentucky HB1, which requires physicians to consult the state's online drug database before prescribing pain medication to a patient).

Such legislation affects the prescribing practices of providers in an attempt to reduce diversion of legitimate opiate prescriptions. Statewide registers of controlled substances are available in many states and can help providers track use patterns among patients in an effort to identify those at high risk of abuse or diversion. While increased availability certainly plays a role in opioid abuse, the link between legitimate use and abuse is not well proven. [12, 11]


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