What are the possible complications of thrombosed external hemorrhoid excision?

Updated: Aug 17, 2018
  • Author: Brett Wallace Lorber, MD, MPH, FACEP; Chief Editor: Erik D Schraga, MD  more...
  • Print
Answer

The following are potential complications of thrombosed external hemorrhoid excision:

  • Bleeding - Probably the most common complication of this procedure, bleeding can usually be well controlled with direct pressure; if hemostasis is not obtained with direct pressure alone, either silver nitrate cauterization or a figure-eight stitch with an absorbable suture can be used
  • Infection – The infection rate is not known but is believed to be lower than 5%; prophylactic antibiotics are not routinely indicated
  • Perianal skin tag - This is a common benign complication after the incised area has healed
  • Stricture - This is an uncommon complication that may be prevented by avoiding the underlying external anal sphincter muscle
  • Incontinence - This is an uncommon complication that may be prevented by avoiding the underlying external anal sphincter muscle
  • Pain - This is a common but avoidable complication that generally is completely preventable with any combination of parenteral and local anesthesia, with or without procedural sedation

Did this answer your question?
Additional feedback? (Optional)
Thank you for your feedback!