What is the clinical history of acute angle-closure glaucoma (AACG)?

Updated: Nov 19, 2018
  • Author: Joseph Freedman, MD; Chief Editor: Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM  more...
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Answer

Classically, patients are elderly, suffer from hyperopia, and have no history of glaucoma. Most commonly, they present with periorbital pain and visual deficits. [8] The pain is boring in nature and associated with an ipsilateral headache. Patients note blurry vision and describe the phenomenon of "seeing halos around objects."

Careful investigation may elucidate a precipitating factor, such as dim light or medications (eg, anticholinergics, sympathomimetics).

In a large percentage of patients, extraocular symptoms and systemic manifestations are the chief complaint. Patients present with headache and may receive medications for migraines or an evaluation for a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several case reports discuss patients presenting with vomiting and abdominal pain that were misdiagnosed with gastroenteritis. [9]


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