Which medications in the drug class Antilipemic Agents are used in the treatment of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease?

Updated: Sep 12, 2019
  • Author: Josefina A Dominguez, MD; Chief Editor: Vincent Lopez Rowe, MD  more...
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Answer

Antilipemic Agents

Antilipemic agents are beneficial in lowering blood cholesterol profiles, thereby possibly reducing the rate of first major vascular events.

Simvastatin (Zocor)

Simvastatin reduces cardiovascular heart disease mortality and morbidity (eg, nonfatal MI or stroke and revascularization procedures) in high-risk patients (ie, those with existing coronary heart disease, diabetes, peripheral vessel disease, or a history of stroke or other cerebrovascular disease). Simvastatin competitively inhibits HMG-CoA, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. Patients should be placed on a cholesterol-lowering diet; the diet should be continued indefinitely.

Pravastatin (Pravachol)

Pravastatin is a lipid-lowering HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. This agent reduces cholesterol biosynthesis and is orally administered in its active form. Pravastatin is rapidly absorbed (peak plasma 1-1.5 h), with a therapeutic response usually seen in 1 week. This agent is highly effective in reducing total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, presumed familiar forms of primary hypercholesterolemia, and mixed dyslipidemia.

Lovastatin (Mevacor, Altoprev)

Lovastatin is a cholesterol-lowering agent that is isolated from a strain of Aspergillus terreus. This HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, which is an early and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Lovastatin is available in immediate-release (Mevacor) and sustained-release (Altocor) dosage forms.

Rosuvastatin (Crestor)

Rosuvastatin is also an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor that decreases cholesterol synthesis and increases cholesterol metabolism. This agent reduces total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels but increases HDL cholesterol levels. Rosuvastatin is used adjunctively with diet and exercise to treat hypercholesterolemia.

Atorvastatin (Lipitor)

Atorvastatin competitively inhibits HMG-CoA reductase, which is responsible for the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. Before initiating therapy, place patients on a cholesterol-lowering diet for 3-6 months, and continue the diet indefinitely. Dosing usually starts with 10 mg/day orally once daily; titrate to a maximum of 80 mg/day as necessary.

Fluvastatin (Lescol)

Fluvastatin competitively inhibits HMG-CoA reductase, which is responsible for the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. Before initiating therapy, place patients on a cholesterol-lowering diet for 3-6 months, and continue the diet indefinitely. Immediate-release capsules (Lescol) and extended-release tablets (Lescol XL) are available. Dose at 20-80 mg/day orally once daily or divided twice daily.


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