Which radiography findings are characteristic of thoracic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)?

Updated: Mar 05, 2019
  • Author: Ali Nawaz Khan, MBBS, FRCS, FRCP, FRCR; Chief Editor: Eugene C Lin, MD  more...
  • Print
Answer

Answer

Radiologically, the appearance of intrathoracic involvement in NHL is generally similar to that of HD (see the images below). Pulmonary parenchymal involvement and mediastinal lymphadenopathy are less common manifestations of NHL than they are of HD. The pattern of pulmonary disease varies with the histologic type of NHL. A mediastinal mass as a presenting feature of NHL occurs in approximately 20% of cases.

Posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph in a man wit Posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph in a man with thoracic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) shows mediastinal widening due to grossly enlarged right paratracheal and left paratracheal nodes.
Posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph shows a larg Posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph shows a large mass in the right parahilar region extending into the right upper and middle zones, with silhouetting of the right pulmonary artery. Smaller mass is seen in the periphery of the right lower zone. The masses did not respond to a trial of antibiotics. Core-needle biopsy of the larger lesion revealed NHL deposits in the lung.
Tomogram of the right lower chest wall demonstrate Tomogram of the right lower chest wall demonstrates the lesion better than previous image in this patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of the ribs.
Anteroposterior (AP) view shows a collapsed verteb Anteroposterior (AP) view shows a collapsed vertebra in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of the thoracic vertebrae.
Image shows a right-sided, hemorrhagic pleural eff Image shows a right-sided, hemorrhagic pleural effusion. Cytologic and pleural biopsy results confirmed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
Lateral myelogram shows abrupt tapering of thecal Lateral myelogram shows abrupt tapering of thecal sac caused by compression of soft tissue associated with the lymphomatous deposit in the thoracic vertebrae.

Did this answer your question?
Additional feedback? (Optional)
Thank you for your feedback!