What are the historical classification systems of amyloidosis?

Updated: Nov 12, 2018
  • Author: Robert O Holmes, Jr, DO; Chief Editor: Herbert S Diamond, MD  more...
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Answer

Until the early 1970s, the idea of a single amyloid substance predominated. Various descriptive classification systems were proposed based on the organ distribution of amyloid deposits and clinical findings. Most classification systems included primary (ie, in the sense of idiopathic) amyloidosis, in which no associated clinical condition was identified, and secondary amyloidosis, which is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. Some classification systems included myeloma-associated, familial, and localized amyloidosis.

The modern era of amyloidosis classification began in the late 1960s with the development of methods to solubilize amyloid fibrils. These methods permitted chemical amyloid studies. Descriptive terms such as primary amyloidosis, secondary amyloidosis, and others (eg, senile amyloidosis), which are not based on etiology, provide little useful information and are no longer recommended.


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