How does the DSM-5 classify depressive disorders?

Updated: Mar 28, 2019
  • Author: Jerry L Halverson, MD; Chief Editor: David Bienenfeld, MD  more...
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Answer

The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) [2] classifies the depressive disorders as disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, major depressive disorder (including major depressive episode), persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia), premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and depressive disorder due to another medical condition. In addition, depressive disorders may be further categorized by specifiers that include peripartum onset, seasonal pattern, melancholic features, mood-congruent or mood-incongruent psychotic features, anxious distress, and catatonia. The common feature of the depressive disorders is the presence of sad, empty, or irritable mood, accompanied by somatic and cognitive changes that significantly affect the individual’s capacity to function. What differs among them are issues of duration, timing, or presumed etiology. [2]


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