How is glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) staged?

Updated: Jul 01, 2019
  • Author: Jeffrey N Bruce, MD; Chief Editor: Herbert H Engelhard, III, MD, PhD, FACS, FAANS  more...
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Answer

Completely staging most glioblastomas is neither practical nor possible because these tumors do not have clearly defined margins. Rather, they exhibit well-known tendencies to invade locally and spread along compact white matter pathways, such as the corpus callosum, internal capsule, optic radiation, anterior commissure, fornix, and subependymal regions. Such spread may create the appearance of multiple glioblastomas or multicentric gliomas on imaging studies.

Careful histological analyses have indicated that only 2-7% of glioblastomas are truly multiple independent tumors rather than distant spread from a primary site. Despite its rapid infiltrative growth, the glioblastoma tends not to invade the subarachnoid space and, consequently, rarely metastasizes via cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Hematogenous spread to extraneural tissues is very rare in patients who have not had previous surgical intervention, and penetration of the dura, venous sinuses, and bone is exceptional. [16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21]


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