What is the pathophysiology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in cerebral hemispheres?

Updated: Jul 01, 2019
  • Author: Jeffrey N Bruce, MD; Chief Editor: Herbert H Engelhard, III, MD, PhD, FACS, FAANS  more...
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Answer

Glioblastoma multiformes occur most often in the subcortical white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. In a series of 987 glioblastomas from University Hospital Zurich, the most frequently affected sites were the temporal (31%), parietal (24%), frontal (23%), and occipital (16%) lobes. [38] Combined frontotemporal location is particularly typical.

Tumor infiltration often extends into the adjacent cortex or the basal ganglia. When a tumor in the frontal cortex spreads across the corpus callosum into the contralateral hemisphere, it creates the appearance of a bilateral symmetric lesion, hence the term butterfly glioma. Sites for glioblastomas that are much less common are the brainstem (which often is found in affected children), the cerebellum, and the spinal cord.


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