Which clinical history findings are characteristic of lymphedema-associated angiosarcoma (LAS)?

Updated: Sep 04, 2018
  • Author: Maria Belén Carsi, MD, PhD, FRCS; Chief Editor: Edwin Choy, MD, PhD  more...
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Answer

Lymphedema-associated angiosarcoma (LAS) was first reported in six patients with postmastectomy lymphedema. In each case, angiosarcoma developed in the ipsilateral arm and occurred several years after mastectomy. Subsequently, LAS was reported after axillary node dissection for melanoma and in the context of congenital lymphedema, filarial lymphedema, and chronic idiopathic lymphedema. The risk for developing LAS 5 years after mastectomy is approximately 5%.The most common site is the medial aspect of the upper arm. LAS presents as a violaceous plaque or nodule superimposed on brawny, nonpitting edema. Ulceration may develop rapidly.


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