What is premature rupture of membranes (PROM)?

Updated: Dec 11, 2017
  • Author: Allahyar Jazayeri, MD, PhD, FACOG, DACOG, FSMFM; Chief Editor: Carl V Smith, MD  more...
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Answer

Answer

Premature rupture of membranes (PROM) refers to a patient who is beyond 37 weeks' gestation and has presented with rupture of membranes (ROM) prior to the onset of labor. Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is ROM prior to 37 weeks' gestation. Spontaneous preterm rupture of the membranes (SPROM) is ROM after or with the onset of labor occurring prior to 37 weeks. Prolonged ROM is any ROM that persists for more than 24 hours and prior to the onset of labor.

At term, programmed cell death and activation of catabolic enzymes, such as collagenase and mechanical forces, result in ruptured membranes. Preterm PROM occurs probably due to the same mechanisms and premature activation of these pathways. However, early PROM also appears to be linked to underlying pathologic processes, most likely due to inflammation and/or infection of the membranes. Clinical factors associated with preterm PROM include low socioeconomic status, low body mass index, tobacco use, preterm labor history, urinary tract infection, vaginal bleeding at any time in pregnancy, cerclage, and amniocentesis. [1]


Source Article: Premature Rupture of Membranes: Overview

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