What are the roles of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)?

Updated: Jun 25, 2021
  • Author: David J Cennimo, MD, FAAP, FACP, FIDSA, AAHIVS; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

On June 15, 2020, the FDA revoked the emergency use authorization (EUA) for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine donated to the Strategic National Stockpile to be used for treating certain hospitalized patients with COVID-19 when a clinical trial was unavailable or participation in a clinical trial was not feasible. [322]

Based on its ongoing analysis of the EUA and emerging scientific data, the FDA determined that hydroxychloroquine is unlikely to be effective in treating COVID-19 for the authorized uses in the EUA. Additionally, in light of ongoing serious cardiac adverse events and other potential serious adverse effects, the known and potential benefits of hydroxychloroquine no longer outweigh the known and potential risks for the EUA.

While additional clinical trials may continue to evaluate potential benefit, the FDA determined the EUA was no longer appropriate.

Additionally, the NIH halted the Outcomes Related to COVID-19 treated with Hydroxychloroquine among In-patients with symptomatic Disease (ORCHID) study on June 20, 2020. After the fourth analysis that included more than 470 participants, the NIH data and safety monitoring board determined that, while there was no harm, the study drug was very unlikely to be beneficial to hospitalized patients with COVID-19. [323]

Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are widely used antimalarial drugs that elicit immunomodulatory effects and are therefore also used to treat autoimmune conditions (eg, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis). As inhibitors of heme polymerase, they are also believed to have additional antiviral activity via alkalinization of the phagolysosome, which inhibits the pH-dependent steps of viral replication. Wang et al reported that chloroquine effectively inhibits SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. [324] The pharmacological activity of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine was tested using SARS-CoV-2–infected Vero cells. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) were conducted for each drug. Hydroxychloroquine was found to be more potent than chloroquine in vitro. Based on PBPK models, the authors recommend a loading dose of hydroxychloroquine 400 mg PO BID, followed by 200 mg BID for 4 days. [325]

Published reports stemming from the worldwide outbreak of COVID-19 have evaluated the potential usefulness of these drugs in controlling cytokine release syndrome in critically ill patients. Owing to widely varying dosage regimens, disease severity, measured outcomes, and lack of control groups, efficacy data have been largely inconclusive. 

 


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