What are the possible consequences of hyperuricemia?

Updated: Aug 31, 2018
  • Author: James W Lohr, MD; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FASN  more...
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Answer

Unlike allantoin, the more soluble end product of purine metabolism in lower animals, uric acid is a poorly soluble end product of purine metabolism in humans. Human beings have higher levels of uric acid, in part, because of a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme uricase, and a lower fractional excretion of uric acid. Approximately two thirds of total body urate is produced endogenously, while the remaining one third is accounted for by dietary purines.

Approximately 70% of the urate produced daily is excreted by the kidneys, while the rest is eliminated by the intestines. However, during renal failure, the intestinal contribution of urate excretion increases to compensate for the decreased elimination by the kidneys.


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