Which medications in the drug class Alpha-Blockers, Antihypertensives are used in the treatment of Hypertension?

Updated: Feb 22, 2019
  • Author: Matthew R Alexander, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Eric H Yang, MD  more...
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Answer

Alpha-Blockers, Antihypertensives

Alpha-blockers are generally not recommended as initial monotherapy. They selectively block postsynaptic alpha1 -adrenergic receptors. They dilate arterioles and veins, thus lowering blood pressure. These drugs can be combined with any of the other antihypertensives in other drug classes. Common side effects seen in this drug class include dizziness, headache, and drowsiness, in addition to orthostatic and first-dose hypotension.

Prazosin (Minipress)

Prazosin is a competitive antagonist at postsynaptic alpha1-receptors. Prazosin causes peripheral vasodilation by selective, competitive inhibition of vascular postsynaptic alpha1-adrenergic receptors, thus reducing peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure.

Terazosin

Terazosin causes peripheral vasodilation by selective, competitive inhibition of vascular postsynaptic alpha1-adrenergic receptors, thereby reducing peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure. Terazosin reduces blood pressure in both the supine and the standing positions, with more dramatic effects on diastolic blood pressure.

Doxazosin (Cardura, Cardura XL)

Doxazosin is a selective alpha1-adrenergic antagonist. It inhibits postsynaptic alpha-adrenergic receptors, resulting in vasodilation of veins and arterioles and a decrease in total peripheral resistance and blood pressure. The antihypertensive effect of doxazosin mesylate results from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance.


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