What is the pathophysiology of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy?

Updated: Feb 15, 2018
  • Author: Sohail Abdul Salim, MD, FASN, FACP; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FASN  more...
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Answer

IgA nephropathy appears to result from an ordered sequence of events, starting with galactose-deficient IgA1, which contains less than a full complement of galactose residues on the O-glycans in the hinge region of the heavy chains. [6] .These may act as auto-antigens that trigger the production of glycan-specific autoantibodies and the formation of circulating immune complexes that are deposited in renal mesangium. These then induce glomerular injury through pro-inflammatory cytokine release, chemokine secretion, and the resultant migration of macrophages into the kidney. [7]  Immune complexes formed by IgG or IgA antibodies with galactose-deficient IgA lead to deposition in the glomerulus.

Deposited IgA is predominantly polymeric IgA1, which is mainly derived from the mucosal immune system. The association of some cases of IgA nephropathy with syndromes that affect the respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract, such as celiac disease, led to the suggestion that IgA nephropathy is a disease of the mucosal immune system. This concept is also supported by the clinical observation that hematuria worsens during or after upper respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract infections.

The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy is controversial. While IgA antibodies cannot activate complement through the classic pathway, studies have shown that complement can be activated by the alternate pathway.


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