Which medications in the drug class Decongestants are used in the treatment of Acute Sinusitis?

Updated: Mar 01, 2018
  • Author: Itzhak Brook, MD, MSc; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

Decongestants

These agents cause vasoconstriction, which reduces nasal congestion. Topical agents are locally active vasoconstrictor agents such as phenylephrine and oxymetazoline, which provide immediate symptomatic relief by shrinking the inflamed and swollen nasal mucosa. Oral decongestants such as pseudoephedrine can be used for 10-14 days to allow for restoration of normal mucociliary function and drainage.

Phenylephrine nasal (Neo-Synephrine Cold & Sinus, Rhinall, Nasal Four)

Phenylephrine produces vasoconstriction. It is possibly helpful and is not harmful.

Oxymetazoline (Afrin 12 Hour, Afrin Sinus, QlearQuil)

Oxymetazoline is applied directly to mucous membranes. It stimulates alpha-adrenergic receptors and causes vasoconstriction. Decongestion occurs without drastic changes in blood pressure, vascular redistribution, or cardiac stimulation.

Tetrahydrozoline, ophthalmic (Tyzine)

The alpha-adrenergic effects of tetrahydrozoline on nasal mucosa produce vasoconstriction.

Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Nexafed, SudoGest, Genaphed)

Phenylephrine produces vasoconstriction. It is possibly helpful and is not harmful.


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