When is inpatient treatment of men with urinary tract infection (UTI) recommended?

Updated: Aug 27, 2019
  • Author: John L Brusch, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

Patients who are well appearing, have stable vital signs, are able to maintain oral hydration and comply with oral therapy, and have no significant comorbid conditions can be treated as outpatients with adequate follow-up arranged in 48-72 hours.

If the patient appears toxic, has obstructive uropathy, has stones, is unable to tolerate fluids by mouth, has significant comorbid disease, or otherwise is unable to care for himself at home, inpatient admission is recommended. For example, consider admission for UTI for elderly patients and patients who have diabetes, who are immunocompromised, or who show signs of dehydration, hyperpyrexia, or rigors.

Initial inpatient treatment includes intravenous (IV) antimicrobial therapy with a third-generation cephalosporin, such as ceftriaxone; a fluoroquinolone, such as ciprofloxacin; or an aminoglycoside. Antipyretics, analgesics, and adequate IV fluids to restore appropriate circulatory volume and promote adequate urinary flow are also important.


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