What is the prevalence of Ureaplasma infection in the US?

Updated: Jul 03, 2019
  • Author: Ken B Waites, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
  • Print
Answer

Ureaplasma species have been isolated from cervicovaginal specimens in 40-80% of women who are asymptomatic and sexually active. M hominis has been isolated from cervicovaginal specimens in 21-53% of women who are asymptomatic and sexually active. [1] These rates are somewhat lower in males. Only a subgroup of adults who are colonized in the lower urogenital tract develop symptomatic illness from these organisms. Nongonococcal urethritis is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Ureaplasma species and M genitalium may account for a significant portion of cases that are not due to chlamydiae. M genitalium is much less likely to be present in the urogenital tract of asymptomatic persons.

More than 20% of liveborn infants may be colonized by Ureaplasma, and infants born preterm most likely harbor the organisms. Colonization declines after age 3 months. Less than 5% of children and 10% of adults who are not sexually active are colonized with genital mycoplasmal microorganisms. [1]

Immunosuppression (eg, from antibody deficiency or prematurity) increases the likelihood of developing disseminated disease. Much less is known about the epidemiology of species such as M genitalium and M fermentans. Some organisms, such as M pirum and M penetrans, have been primarily isolated from persons with HIV infection but their significance as pathogens in this population has not been established. [1]


Did this answer your question?
Additional feedback? (Optional)
Thank you for your feedback!