What happens if group A streptococcal (GAS) impetigo (impetigo contagiosa) (nonbullous impetigo) is left untreated?

Updated: Sep 07, 2018
  • Author: Zartash Zafar Khan, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Pranatharthi Haran Chandrasekar, MBBS, MD  more...
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Answer

Lesions are most commonly encountered on the face and extremities. If untreated, streptococcal impetigo is a mild, but chronic, illness, often spreading to other parts of the body. Regional lymphadenitis is common. The M types that give rise to streptococcal tonsillitis (ie, types 1, 3, 5, 6, 12, 18, 19, 24) are rarely found in streptococcal impetigo. One of the streptococcal pyoderma-associated strains, the M49 strain, is very strongly associated with PSGN.


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