Which medications in the drug class Tetracyclines are used in the treatment of Cellulitis?

Updated: Jun 14, 2019
  • Author: Thomas E Herchline, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

Tetracyclines

The tetracyclines reversibly bind to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome. They prevent the binding of aminoacyl transfer RNA and inhibit protein synthesis and cell growth. Tetracyclines are effective against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.

Doxycycline (Doryx, Adoxa)

Doxycycline inhibits protein synthesis and thus bacterial growth by binding to 30S and possibly 50S ribosomal subunits of susceptible bacteria. It provides good coverage against spirochetes, many gram-negative organisms, anaerobic organisms, atypical bacteria, and many gram-positive organisms, including most CA-MRSA.

Minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin Kit, Minocin, Myrac, Solodyn, Vectrin)

Minocycline inhibits protein synthesis and thus bacterial growth by binding to 30S and possibly 50S ribosomal subunits of susceptible bacteria. This drug covers gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, as well as CA-MRSA. Minocycline is a first-line agent against organisms such as Afipia felis, Borrelia recurrentis, Chlamydia species, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and V cholerae.

Omadacycline (Nuzyra)

Aminomethylcycline antibacterial within the tetracycline drug class that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and blocks protein synthesis. It is active in vitro against gram-positive bacteria expressing tetracycline resistance active efflux pumps (tetK and tet L) and ribosomal protection proteins (tet M). It is indicated for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) caused by susceptible microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant isolates), Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus anginosus group (includes Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus constellatus), Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Available for IV or PO administration.


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