Which medications in the drug class Macrolides are used in the treatment of Cellulitis?

Updated: Jun 14, 2019
  • Author: Thomas E Herchline, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

Macrolides

Macrolides are agents that bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit of susceptible organisms, resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. Examples such as azithromycin, erythromycin, and clarithromycin are all reasonable alternatives in patients who are allergic to penicillins.

Azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax)

Azithromycin acts by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of susceptible microorganisms and blocking dissociation of peptidyl tRNA from ribosomes, causing RNA-dependent protein synthesis to arrest. Nucleic acid synthesis is not affected. It is used to treat mild to moderate microbial infections.

Erythromycin (Erythrocin, E.E.S., Ery-Tab, EryPed)

Erythromycin inhibits bacterial growth, possibly by blocking dissociation of peptidyl tRNA from ribosomes, causing RNA-dependent protein synthesis to arrest. It is used for the treatment of staphylococcal (not MRSA) and streptococcal infections.

Clarithromycin (Biaxin, Biaxin XL)

Clarithromycin is a semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic that reversibly binds to the P site of the 50S ribosomal subunit of susceptible organisms and may inhibit RNA-dependent protein synthesis by stimulating dissociation of peptidyl t-RNA from ribosomes, causing bacterial growth inhibition. It has a similar susceptibility profile to erythromycin but has fewer adverse effects.


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