Which medications in the drug class Penicillins, Penicillinase Resistant are used in the treatment of Cellulitis?

Updated: Jun 14, 2019
  • Author: Thomas E Herchline, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
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Answer

Penicillins, Penicillinase Resistant

The penicillinase-resistant, or second-generation, penicillins are semisynthetic modifications of natural penicillins that are resistant to bacterial enzyme beta-lactamase, which accounts for typical penicillin resistance.

Oxacillin

Oxacillin is a bactericidal antibiotic that inhibits cell wall synthesis. It is used in the treatment of infections caused by penicillinase-producing staphylococci. It may be used to initiate therapy when a methicillin-sensitive staphylococcal infection (MSSA) is suspected.

Dicloxacillin

Dicloxacillin binds to one or more penicillin-binding proteins, which, in turn, inhibits synthesis of bacterial cell walls. It is used for the treatment of infections caused by streptococci and penicillinase-producing staphylococci. It may be used to initiate therapy when staphylococcal or streptococcal infection is suspected. Resistance to this drug results from alterations in penicillin-binding proteins. This drug does not cover MRSA.

Nafcillin

Nafcillin binds to penicillin-binding proteins, which, in turn, inhibits synthesis of bacterial cell walls. Resistance occurs by alterations in penicillin-binding proteins. It is used as initial therapy for suspected streptococcal and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections (not MRSA).


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