What is the mortality rate for hereditary and acquired hypercoagulability?

Updated: Jan 05, 2018
  • Author: Paul Schick, MD; Chief Editor: Srikanth Nagalla, MBBS, MS, FACP  more...
  • Print
Answer

Morbidity and mortality in patients with hypercoagulable states and thrombophilia are primarily due to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolism is associated with a 1-3% mortality rate. The incidence of factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210A is significantly greater than that of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (ATIII) deficiencies. However, the risk of venous thrombosis in protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (ATIII) deficiencies is greater than in factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210A, as shown in Table 1.

Table 1.  Prevalence of Acquired or Hereditary Hypercoagulable Disorders and Risks of Venous Thrombosis. (Open Table in a new window)

Condition

Prevalence in General Population (%)

Relative Risk of VTE (%)

Relative Risk of Recurrent VTE (%)

Factor V Leiden

(heterozygous)

3-7

4.3

1.3

Prothrombin 20210A

(heterozygous)

1-3

1.9

1.4

Protein C deficiency

(heterozygous)

0.02-0.05

11.3

2.5

Protein S deficiency

(heterozygous)

0.01-1

32.4

2.5

Antithrombin deficiency

(heterozygous)

0.02-0.04

17.5

2.5

VTE = Venous thromboembolism


Did this answer your question?
Additional feedback? (Optional)
Thank you for your feedback!