Which features of malignant hypertensive emergencies contribute to increased mortality?

Updated: Feb 05, 2018
  • Author: Christy Hopkins, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Barry E Brenner, MD, PhD, FACEP  more...
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Answer

Answer

A study by Amraoui et al found a higher all-cause mortality rate in patients with malignant hypertension than in persons who were normotensive or hypertensive, even though the cardiovascular risk profile for the malignant hypertension patients was more favorable than that for the hypertensive controls. [14] The study, which compared 120 patients with a history of malignant hypertension with 120 normotensive and 120 hypertensive persons, found that the malignant hypertension patients had lower total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and body mass index values than did the hypertensive controls. However, the median estimated glomerular filtration rate was higher in the normotensive and hypertensive controls than in the malignant hypertension group. Annual all-cause mortality per 100 patient-years was 2.6 for the patients with malignant hypertension, compared to 0.2 and 0.5 for the normotensive and hypertensive controls, respectively. [14]

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