What are the signs and symptoms of vasculitic wounds?

Updated: Apr 24, 2020
  • Author: Brian J Daley, MD, MBA, FACS, FCCP, CNSC; Chief Editor: Zubin J Panthaki, MD, CM, FACS, FRCSC  more...
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Answer

Vasculitic wounds tend to occur throughout the lower legs as multiple, small, painful, erythematous nodules. Scars resulting from previous vasculitic lesions may be a useful clue. Any of the disparate systemic manifestations of the diseases of cellular immunity associated with atypical skin lesions, including unexplained fevers, jaw claudication, malaise, Raynaud phenomenon, myalgias, neurologic abnormalities, and craniofacial pain syndromes, suggest the possibility of vasculitis. These lesions are rare.

The differential diagnosis of wounds with these features includes other uncommon problems, such as anticoagulant-induced skin necrosis, atheroembolism syndrome (ie, trash foot), and Buerger disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitides represent a disparate group of acquired connective tissue problems; patients present with palpable purpuric skin lesions, petechiae, and ecchymoses, usually involving the lower extremities. These syndromes include Wegener granulomatosis, Sjögren syndrome, cryoglobulinemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, and hepatitis B. The common factor among these syndromes is a hypersensitivity angiitis. [21]

Skin biopsy demonstrates cuffing of the dermal microcirculation by granulocytes, which are found in diverse stages of viability, including complete cellular disintegration (ie, nuclear dust). The various disorders in this group are differentiated by clinical and serologic criteria. The presence of asymptomatic palpable purpura without thrombocytopenia suggests a drug adverse effect, such as those caused by iodides, penicillin, aspirin, chlorothiazides, oxytetracycline, isoniazid, or benzoic acid.


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