What is the role of thrombosis and fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT)?

Updated: Jun 05, 2019
  • Author: Kaushal (Kevin) Patel, MD; Chief Editor: Barry E Brenner, MD, PhD, FACEP  more...
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Answer

Thrombosis is the homeostatic mechanism whereby blood coagulates or clots, a process crucial to the establishment of hemostasis after a wound. It may be initiated via several pathways, usually consisting of cascading activation of enzymes that magnify the effect of an initial trigger event. A similar complex of events results in fibrinolysis, or the dissolution of thrombi. The balance of trigger factors and enzymes is complex. Microscopic thrombus formation and thrombolysis (dissolution) are continuous events, but with increased stasis, procoagulant factors, or endothelial injury, the coagulation-fibrinolysis balance may favor the pathologic formation of an obstructive thrombus. Clinically relevant deep venous thrombosis is the persistent formation of macroscopic thrombus in the deep proximal veins.


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