What is the role of stress in the development of abdominal inguinal hernias?

Updated: Jul 23, 2019
  • Author: Assar A Rather, MBBS, MD, FACS; Chief Editor: John Geibel, MD, DSc, MSc, AGAF  more...
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Answer

Clinical presentations suggest repetitive stress as a factor in hernia development. Increased intra-abdominal pressure is seen in a variety of disease states and seems to contribute to hernia formation in these populations. Elevated intra-abdominal pressure is associated with chronic cough, ascites, increased peritoneal fluid from biliary atresia, peritoneal dialysis or ventriculoperitoneal shunts, intraperitoneal masses or organomegaly, and obstipation. (See the images below.)

Ventriculoperitoneal shunt, decreased activity, an Ventriculoperitoneal shunt, decreased activity, and acute scrotal swelling in 6-month-old boy.
Ventriculoperitoneal shunt, decreased activity, an Ventriculoperitoneal shunt, decreased activity, and acute scrotal swelling in 6-month-old boy. Abdominal radiograph shows incarcerated shunt within communicating hydrocele. Repair of hydrocele relieved increased intracranial pressure.

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