Which medications in the drug class Diuretic Agents are used in the treatment of Budd-Chiari Syndrome?

Updated: Oct 10, 2018
  • Author: Praveen K Roy, MD, AGAF; Chief Editor: BS Anand, MD  more...
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Answer

Diuretic Agents

Diuretics can be useful to reduce the amount of ascites, providing symptomatic relief and reducing the need for paracentesis.

Spironolactone (Aldactone)

Spironolactone is a potassium-sparing diuretic. It competes with aldosterone for receptor sites in the distal renal tubules, increasing water excretion while retaining potassium and hydrogen ions.

This agent is often preferred because of its potassium-sparing effects, particularly in a clinical setting that includes secondary hyperaldosteronism.

Furosemide (Lasix)

Furosemide increases the excretion of water by interfering with the chloride-binding cotransport system, which, in turn, inhibits sodium and chloride reabsorption in the ascending loop of Henle and the distal renal tubule.

Torsemide (Demadex)

Torsemide increases the excretion of water by interfering with the chloride-binding co-transport system, which, in turn, inhibits sodium and chloride reabsorption in the ascending loop of Henle and distal renal tubule. It increases the excretion of water, sodium, chloride, magnesium, and calcium. If a switch is made from intravenous to oral administration, an equivalent oral dose should be used. Doses vary depending on the patient's clinical condition.

Chlorothiazide (Diuril)

A thiazide diuretic, chlorothiazide inhibits sodium-chloride symport, blocking sodium reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule.

Hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide)

Hydrochlorothiazide acts on the distal nephron to impair sodium reabsorption, enhancing sodium excretion. It has been in use for more than 40 years and is generally an important agent for the treatment of essential hypertension.


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