Which medications in the drug class Lipid-lowering Agents, Non-Statin are used in the treatment of Metabolic Syndrome?

Updated: Mar 29, 2017
  • Author: Stanley S Wang, JD, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Yasmine S Ali, MD, FACC, FACP, MSCI  more...
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Answer

Lipid-lowering Agents, Non-Statin

These agents are used to improve lipid profile in patients.

Niacin (Niacor, Niaspan, Slo-Niacin)

Niacin is used in tissue respiration, lipid metabolism, and glycogenolysis. Nicotinic acid has lipid-lowering properties, but nicotinamide and niacinamide do not. Inositol hexanicotinate is a "no flush" form that may not release enough niacin to be effective.

Niacin is available as a prescription, Niaspan, or over the counter as Slo-Niacin. Allergies are common, but another form may be tolerated. In addition to improving low HDL-C levels, niacin may lower triglycerides and LDL-C levels.

Fenofibrate (TriCor, Triglide, Lipofen, Lofibra)

Fenofibrate increases VLDL catabolism by enhancing synthesis of lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid oxidation, and elimination of triglyceride-rich particles. This results in decreased triglyceride levels by 30-60%; HDL may increase.

Fenofibric acid (Trilipix, Fibricor)

Fenofibric acid increases VLDL catabolism by enhancing synthesis of lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid oxidation, and elimination of triglyceride-rich particles. This results in decreased triglyceride levels by 30-60%; HDL may increase.

Gemfibrozil (Lopid)

Gemfibrozil may decrease serum VLDL levels by inhibiting lipolysis, decreasing subsequent hepatic fatty acid uptake, and by inhibiting hepatic secretion of VLDL.


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