Which medications in the drug class ACE Inhibitors are used in the treatment of Unstable Angina?

Updated: Oct 01, 2020
  • Author: Walter Tan, MD, MS; Chief Editor: Eric H Yang, MD  more...
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Answer

ACE Inhibitors

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce angiotensin II levels, thus decreasing aldosterone secretion. They are of particular benefit in patients with large anterior infarctions, especially those with compromised left ventricular function (eg, from STEMI) but without hypotension. The benefit in patients with unstable angina is less clear. Currently, ACE inhibitors are recommended in patients with left ventricular dysfunction or congestive heart failure, diabetes, and hypertension.

Captopril (Capoten)

Captopril prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in lower aldosterone secretion.

Lisinopril (Zestril)

Lisinopril prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in increased levels of plasma renin and a reduction in aldosterone secretion.

Enalapril (Vasotec)

Enalapril prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in increased levels of plasma renin and a reduction in aldosterone secretion. This agent helps to control blood pressure and proteinuria.

Enalapril decreases pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio in the catheterization laboratory and increases systemic blood flow in patients with relatively low pulmonary vascular resistance. It has a favorable clinical effect when administered over a long period. Enalapril helps to prevent potassium loss in the distal tubules. The body conserves potassium; thus, less oral potassium supplementation is needed.

Ramipril (Altace)

Ramipril prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in increased levels of plasma renin and a reduction in aldosterone secretion.


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