Which medications in the drug class Beta-Adrenergic Blocking Agents are used in the treatment of Long QT Syndrome?

Updated: Nov 29, 2017
  • Author: Ali A Sovari, MD, FACP, FACC; Chief Editor: Mikhael F El-Chami, MD  more...
  • Print
Answer

Beta-Adrenergic Blocking Agents

Antiadrenergic therapy effectively protects most patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS). Beta-blockers, especially propranolol, are the drugs most frequently used in patients with LQTS. Inform patients and their family members that beta-blockers should be continued indefinitely. Interruption in beta-blocker therapy may increase the risk of cardiac events.

Propranolol (Inderal LA, Inderal XL, InnoPran XL, Hemangeol)

Propranolol decreases the effect of sympathetic stimulation on the heart. It decreases conduction through the atrioventricular (AV) node and has negative chronotropic and inotropic effects. Consult a cardiologist because dosing varies and is individualized in patients with LQTS. Patients with asthma should use cardioselective beta-blockers. Patients with LQTS who cannot take beta-blockers may require an ICD as first-line therapy.

Nadolol (Corgard)

Nadolol is frequently prescribed because of its long-term effect. This agent decreases the effect of sympathetic stimulation on the heart. Nadolol decreases conduction through the AV node and has negative chronotropic and inotropic effects. Consult a cardiologist because dosing varies and is individualized in patients with LQTS. Patients with asthma should use cardioselective beta-blockers. Patients with LQTS who cannot take beta-blockers may require an ICD as first-line therapy.

Metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)

Metoprolol is a selective beta1-adrenergic receptor blocker that decreases the automaticity of contractions. During intravenous (IV) administration, carefully monitor blood pressure, heart rate, and ECG. Consult a cardiologist because dosing varies and is individualized in patients with LQTS. Patients with LQTS who cannot take beta-blockers may require an ICD as first-line therapy.

Atenolol (Tenormin)

Atenolol selectively blocks beta1-receptors with little or no effect on beta2 types. Consult a cardiologist because dosing varies and is individualized in patients with LQTS. Patients with LQTS who cannot take beta-blockers may require an ICD as first-line therapy.


Did this answer your question?
Additional feedback? (Optional)
Thank you for your feedback!