Which medications in the drug class Beta-adrenergic blockers are used in the treatment of Myocardial Infarction?

Updated: May 07, 2019
  • Author: A Maziar Zafari, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA; Chief Editor: Eric H Yang, MD  more...
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Answer

Beta-adrenergic blockers

This category of drugs has the potential to suppress ventricular ectopy due to ischemia or excess catecholamines. In the setting of myocardial ischemia, beta-blockers have antiarrhythmic properties and reduce myocardial oxygen demand secondary to elevations in heart rate and inotropy.

Metoprolol (Lopressor)

This category of drugs, which includes metoprolol (Lopressor) and esmolol (Brevibloc), has the potential to suppress ventricular ectopy due to ischemia or excess catecholamines. In the setting of myocardial ischemia, beta-blockers have antiarrhythmic properties and reduce myocardial oxygen demand secondary to elevations in heart rate and inotropy.

Esmolol (Brevibloc)

Esmolol is a useful drug for patients at risk of experiencing complications from beta-blockers, particularly reactive airway disease, mild-to-moderate left ventricular dysfunction, and peripheral vascular disease. Its short half-life of 8 minutes allows for titration to desired effect, with the ability to stop quickly if necessary.

Atenolol (Tenormin)

Used to treat hypertension. Selectively blocks beta1-receptors with little or no effect on beta 2 types. Beta-adrenergic blocking agents affect blood pressure via multiple mechanisms. Actions include negative chronotropic effect that decreases heart rate at rest and after exercise, negative inotropic effect that decreases cardiac output, reduction of sympathetic outflow from the CNS, and suppression of renin release from the kidneys. Used to improve and preserve hemodynamic status by acting on myocardial contractility, reducing congestion, and decreasing myocardial energy expenditure.

Beta-adrenergic blockers reduce inotropic state of left ventricle, decrease diastolic dysfunction, and increase LV compliance, thereby reducing pressure gradient across LV outflow tract. Decreases myocardial oxygen consumption, thereby reducing myocardial ischemia potential. Decreases heart rate, thus reducing myocardial oxygen consumption and reducing myocardial ischemia potential.

During IV administration, carefully monitor blood pressure, heart rate, and ECG.


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