Which medications in the drug class Calcium Channel Blockers, Non-dihydropyridine are used in the treatment of Holiday Heart Syndrome?

Updated: May 30, 2018
  • Author: Lawrence Rosenthal, MD, PhD, FACC, FHRS; Chief Editor: Jose M Dizon, MD  more...
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Answer

Calcium Channel Blockers, Non-dihydropyridine

In specialized conducting and automatic cells in the heart, calcium is involved in the generation of the action potential. Calcium channel blockers inhibit the movement of calcium ions across the cell membrane, thus depressing both impulse formation (automaticity) and conduction velocity.

Diltiazem (Cardizem CD, Dilacor, Tiazac)

Diltiazem has a relatively balanced effect on both the myocardium as well as the peripheral vasculature. Similar to verapamil, this agent should be used with caution whenever left ventricular systolic dysfunction is present.

Diltiazem may be given as an IV bolus or as an infusion.

Verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS, Verelan)

Verapamil is the most cardioselective of the calcium channel blockers, with minimal effect on the peripheral vasculature. It should be used with caution whenever left ventricular systolic dysfunction is present.

Verapamil may be given as an IV bolus or as an infusion. In general, verapamil infusions are used less commonly when compared with use of diltiazem.


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