Which medications in the drug class Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARBs) are used in the treatment of Dilated Cardiomyopathy?

Updated: Nov 28, 2018
  • Author: Vinh Q Nguyen, MD; Chief Editor: Gyanendra K Sharma, MD, FACC, FASE  more...
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Answer

Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARBs)

Angiotensin receptor blockers are as effective as ACE inhibitors in the treatment of heart failure. Their adverse-effect profile is similar to that of ACE inhibitors with regard to renal insufficiency or hyperkalemia but they do not cause potentiation of bradykinin and therefore do not cause cough.

Valsartan (Diovan)

Valsartan is used in patients who cannot tolerate ACE inhibitors. It may induce more complete inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system than ACE inhibitors. Valsartan does not affect the response to bradykinin and is less likely to be associated with cough and angioedema.

Losartan (Cozaar)

Losartan is an ARB that blocks the vasoconstrictor and aldosterone-secreting effects of angiotensin II. It may induce a more complete inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system than ACE inhibitors, it does not affect the response to bradykinin, and it is less likely to be associated with cough and angioedema. It is used for patients unable to tolerate ACE inhibitors.

Candesartan (Atacand)

Candesartan blocks the vasoconstrictor and aldosterone-secreting effects of angiotensin II. It may induce more complete inhibition of renin-angiotensin system than ACE inhibitors, it does not affect response to bradykinin, and it is less likely to be associated with cough and angioedema. It is used in patients unable to tolerate ACE inhibitors.

Olmesartan (Benicar)

Olmesartan blocks the vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II by selectively blocking binding of angiotensin II to the AT-1 receptor in vascular smooth muscle. Its action is independent of pathways for angiotensin II synthesis.


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