Which medications in the drug class Anticoagulants, Cardiovascular are used in the treatment of Wellens Syndrome?

Updated: Jan 25, 2018
  • Author: Benjamin B Mattingly, MD; Chief Editor: Erik D Schraga, MD  more...
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Answer

Anticoagulants, Cardiovascular

Anticoagulants are used for anticoagulation in patients with unstable angina.

Lepirudin (Refludan)

Lepirudin is a recombinant hirudin derived from yeast cells. When compared with UFH in unstable angina trials, hirudin demonstrated a modest short-term reduction in the composite endpoint of death or nonfatal MI. The risk of bleeding is modestly increased. Currently, hirudin is indicated only in patients who are unable to receive heparin because of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

Bivalirudin (Angiomax)

Bivalirudin is a synthetic analogue of recombinant hirudin. It inhibits thrombin and is used for anticoagulation in patients with unstable angina who are undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). With provisional use of a GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor, it is indicated for anticoagulation in patients undergoing PCI.

The potential advantages of bivalirudin therapy over conventional heparin therapy include more predictable and precise levels of anticoagulation, activity against clot-bound thrombin, absence of natural inhibitors (eg, platelet factor 4 and heparinase), and continued efficacy after clearance from plasma (because of binding to thrombin).

Argatroban

Argatroban is a selective thrombin inhibitor that inhibits thrombin formation by binding to the active thrombin site of free and fibrin-bound thrombin. It inhibits thrombin-induced platelet aggregation.

Dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa)

Dabigatran etexilate is a selective thrombin inhibitor that inhibits thrombin formation by binding to the active thrombin site of free and fibrin-bound thrombin. It inhibits thrombin-induced platelet aggregation.


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