What is the role of placental growth factor (PIGF) measurement in the diagnosis of preeclampsia?

Updated: Nov 29, 2018
  • Author: Kee-Hak Lim, MD; Chief Editor: Ronald M Ramus, MD  more...
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Answer

A test that measures the PIGF level in the blood (Triage) accurately identified preeclampsia requiring delivery in a prospective study of 625 pregnant women presenting before 35 weeks' gestation with suspected preeclampsia. Of the 625 subjects, 346 (55%) developed confirmed preeclampsia. [54, 55]

Between 20 and 34 weeks' gestation, the sensitivity of the Triage test in predicting the need for delivery within 14 days was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–0.99), and the negative predictive value was 0.98 (95% CI 0.93–0.995). [54, 55] Between 35 and 36 weeks' gestation, the sensitivity was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.58–0.81), and the negative predictive value was 0.69 (95% CI 0.57–0.80). At 37 weeks' gestation or more, the sensitivity was 0.57 (95% CI, 0.46–0.68), and the negative predictive value was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.62–0.78). [54, 55]

A PlGF level below 100 pg/mL was just as good as a PlGF level below the fifth centile for gestational age at predicting preeclampsia requiring delivery within 14 days. PIGF levels lower than 12 pg/mL indicated an average time to delivery of just 9 days. Used alone or in combination , the PlGF test was significantly (P< 0.001) better than other commonly used tests, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure, uric acid, alanine transaminase, and proteinuria, in predicting preeclampsia requiring delivery within 14 days. [54, 55]


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