What are the increased risks of early-onset preeclampsia?

Updated: Nov 29, 2018
  • Author: Kee-Hak Lim, MD; Chief Editor: Ronald M Ramus, MD  more...
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Answer

Answer

Early-onset preeclampsia was significantly associated with a high risk for fetal death (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 5.8), but late-onset preeclampsia was not (AOR, 1.3). However, the AOR for perinatal death/severe neonatal morbidity was significant for both early-onset (16.4) and late-onset (2.0) preeclampsia. [41, 42]

In addition, the incidence of preeclampsia increased sharply as gestation progressed: the rate for early-onset preeclampsia was 0.38% compared with 2.72% for late-onset preeclampsia. [41, 42]

Table 1 lists the risk factors and their odds ratios for preeclampsia. [2]

Table 1. Risk Factors for Preeclampsia* (Open Table in a new window)

Nulliparity

3:1

Age >40 y

3:1

Black race

1.5:1

Family history

5:1

Chronic renal disease

20:1

Chronic hypertension

10:1

Antiphospholipid syndrome

10:1

Diabetes mellitus

2:1

Twin gestation (but unaffected by zygosity)

4:1

High body mass index

3:1

Angiotensinogen gene T235

 

Homozygous

20:1

Heterozygous

4:1

*Adapted from ACOG Technical Bulletin 219, Washington, DC 1996. [1]

 


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