Which medications in the drug class Decongestants are used in the treatment of Allergic Rhinitis?

Updated: Dec 26, 2018
  • Author: Javed Sheikh, MD; Chief Editor: Michael A Kaliner, MD  more...
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Answer

Decongestants

Stimulate vasoconstriction by directly activating alpha-adrenergic receptors of the respiratory mucosa. Pseudoephedrine produces weak bronchial relaxation (unlike epinephrine or ephedrine) and is not effective for treating asthma. Increases heart rate and contractility by stimulating beta-adrenergic receptors, and increases blood pressure by stimulating alpha adrenergic receptors. Used alone or in combination with antihistamines to treat nasal congestion. Anxiety and insomnia may occur. Expectorants may thin and loosen secretions, although experimental evidence for their efficacy is limited. Numerous preparations are available containing combinations of various decongestants, expectorants, or antihistamines. Alternatively, a separate decongestant and antihistamine can be administered to allow for individual dose titration of each drug.

Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Genaphed, Psudatabs, SudoGest, Suphedrine, Zephrex-D)

Stimulates vasoconstriction by directly activating alpha-adrenergic receptors of the respiratory mucosa. Available OTC in the United States. Helpful for nasal and sinus congestion.


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