What are the characteristics of juvenile idiopathic scoliosis?

Updated: Dec 02, 2020
  • Author: Charles T Mehlman, DO, MPH; Chief Editor: Jeffrey A Goldstein, MD  more...
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Answer

Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis most closely mimics the epidemiology and demographics of the adolescent version of the disease. It is more common in females, and its most common curve pattern is a right thoracic curve. [9] In fact, given its demographic similarities, high rate of progression, and need for surgery, juvenile idiopathic scoliosis might be considered to be a malignant subtype of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

Robinson and McMaster studied 109 patients with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis in Scotland and found that 95% (104 of 109 patients) demonstrated curve progression and 64% (70 of 109 patients) progressed to require a spinal fusion. [9] This spinal fusion rate is similar to that reported by James 15 years earlier. [95]

A study from Washington University found a 50% rate of neural axis abnormalities in young children (< 10 years) with idiopathic scoliosis. [96] These findings included Chiari type I malformations and dural ectasia. At least one case report also exists in which a spinal intraosseous arteriovenous malformation was found in association with juvenile scoliosis. [97]


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