What causes latent nystagmus?

Updated: Oct 08, 2019
  • Author: Mark Ventocilla, OD, FAAO; Chief Editor: Edsel Ing, MD, MPH, FRCSC  more...
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Answer

Latent nystagmus is a conjugate, jerk nystagmus with the fast phase toward the side of the fixing eye. It is often seen in patients with congenital esotropia and following surgery for infantile esotropia, probably resulting from subnormal binocular interaction. Latent nystagmus can coexist with manifest nystagmus (in which case the nystagmus amplitude increases with occlusion). Latent nystagmus is a jerk nystagmus with the fast phase toward the side of the fixing eye. It often is seen following surgery for infantile esotropia and probably results from subnormal binocular interaction. Visual acuity measurement should be performed using the polarized vectograph or blurring one eye with a high plus lens to avoid iatrogenic reduction of acuity with occlusion. So-called manifest latent nystagmus can occur if monocular visual loss occurs in this setting.


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