Which medications in the drug class Sulfonylureas are used in the treatment of Glucose Intolerance?

Updated: Jun 28, 2019
  • Author: Samuel T Olatunbosun, MD, FACP, FACE; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD  more...
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Answer

Sulfonylureas

Sulfonylureas stimulate insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. These agents include chlorpropamide and tolbutamide (first-generation), as well as glipizide, glyburide, and glimepiride (second-generation), are secretagogues (ie, medications that stimulate insulin secretion).

Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL)

Glipizide is a second-generation sulfonylurea that stimulates the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells.

Glyburide (Glynase)

Glyburide is a second-generation sulfonylurea and is more potent and exhibits fewer drug interactions than first-generation agents.

Glimepiride (Amaryl)

Glimepiride is a third-generation sulfonylurea that may cause more physiologic insulin release than some of the older agents.

Chlorpropamide (Diabinese, Glucamide)

Chlorpropamide is a first-generation sulfonylurea that stimulates the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. It is the longest-acting sulfonylurea, present in blood longer than 24 hour in many patients, and longer in patients with renal insufficiency.

Tolbutamide

First-generation sulfonylurea that stimulates the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells.


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