Which medications in the drug class Anticonvulsants, Neuronal Potassium Channel Opener are used in the treatment of Epilepsy and Seizures?

Updated: May 30, 2019
  • Author: David Y Ko, MD; Chief Editor: Selim R Benbadis, MD  more...
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Answer

Anticonvulsants, Neuronal Potassium Channel Opener

Stabilizes neuronal KCNQ (Kv7) channels in the open position, increasing the stabilizing membrane current and preventing bursts of action potentials during the sustained depolarizations associated with seizures.

Ezogabine (Potiga)

Ezogabine is a neuronal potassium channel opener that stabilizes neuronal KCNQ (Kv7) channels in the open position, increasing the stabilizing membrane current and preventing bursts of action potentials during the sustained depolarizations associated with seizures. It is indicated as adjunctive therapy in partial-onset seizures uncontrolled by current medications.

Owing to the presence of potassium channels in the bladder, there is a small risk of urinary retention. Ezogabine can cause skin discoloration and abnormalities of the eye characterized as changes in the pigment in the retina. Whether these changes are permanent and whether pigment changes in the retina have the potential to cause loss of vision are unknown.

The FDA recommends that all patients taking ezogabine undergo baseline and periodic eye examinations and discontinue the medication if changes are observed, unless there is no other treatment option. Skin discoloration most often appeared as blue around the lips and nail beds but was also reported to be widespread on the face and legs. In patients with skin discoloration, alternative treatments should be considered, but the FDA warns of serious and life-threatening reactions to the sudden discontinuance of the medication.


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