Which medications in the drug class Antidiabetics, Rapid-Acting Insulins are used in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus?

Updated: Oct 23, 2019
  • Author: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD  more...
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Answer

Antidiabetics, Rapid-Acting Insulins

Rapid-acting insulins have a short duration of action and are appropriate for use before meals or when blood glucose levels exceed target levels and correction doses are needed. These agents are associated with less hypoglycemia than regular insulin.

Insulin aspart (NovoLog, Fiasp)

Insulin aspart has a short onset of action of 5-15 minutes and a short duration of action of 3-5 hours. The peak effect occurs within 30-90 minutes. Insulin aspart is FDA approved for use in insulin pumps.

Fiasp also has a rapid onset of action, with its first measurable effect occurring within 16-20 minutes. The peak effect occurs within 91-133 minutes, and the usual duration of action is 5-7 hours.

Insulin glulisine (Apidra)

Insulin glulisine has a rapid onset of action of 5-15 minutes and a short duration of action of 3-5 hours. The peak effect occurs within 30-90 minutes. Insulin glulisine is FDA approved for use in insulin pumps.

Insulin lispro (Humalog)

Insulin lispro has a rapid onset of action of 5-15 minutes and a short duration of action of 4 hours.

Insulin inhaled (Afrezza)

Orally inhaled rapid-acting insulin in powder form. When 8 units were administered, maximum serum insulin concentration was reached by 12-15 minutes and declined to baseline by about 180 minutes.


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