Which medications in the drug class Beta-blockers are used in the treatment of Childhood Migraine Variants?

Updated: Nov 19, 2019
  • Author: Wendy G Mitchell, MD; Chief Editor: Stephen L Nelson, Jr, MD, PhD, FAACPDM, FAAN, FAAP, FANA  more...
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Answer

Beta-blockers

Beta-blockers are effective in migraine prophylactic therapy, possibly by blocking vasodilators, decreasing platelet adhesiveness and aggregation, stabilizing membranes, or increasing the release of oxygen to tissues.

Propranolol (Inderal)

Taken long-term, beta-blockers such as propranolol are frequently effective in reducing the number and severity of attacks. When administering this medication, start with the lowest dose and increase the dose gradually (usually at monthly intervals) to allow each dose level to exert its maximum effect.

Timolol

Timolol is FDA approved for migraine prophylaxis, although there is less scientific evidence of efficacy for timolol than for propranolol.

Metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)

Metoprolol is not FDA approved for migraine prevention. Efficacy in prophylactic therapy is presumably by blocking vasodilators, decreasing platelet adhesiveness and aggregation, stabilizing membranes, or increasing the release of oxygen to tissues.

Nadolol (Corgard)

Nadolol is not FDA approved for migraine prevention. Efficacy in prophylactic therapy is presumably by blocking vasodilators, decreasing platelet adhesiveness and aggregation, stabilizing membranes, or increasing the release of oxygen to tissues.

Atenolol (Tenormin)

Atenolol is not FDA approved for migraine prevention. Efficacy in prophylactic therapy is presumably by blocking vasodilators, decreasing platelet adhesiveness and aggregation, stabilizing membranes, or increasing the release of oxygen to tissues.


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