What is chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH)?

Updated: Jun 12, 2019
  • Author: Monica Saini, MD, MBBS; more...
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Answer

Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH), also known as Sjaastad syndrome, was first described in 1974, by Sjaastad and Dale. [1] In 1976, the term CPH was proposed by Sjaastad on the basis of the first 2 patients, who had daily (ie, chronic), solitary, limited attacks (ie, paroxysmal) of unilateral headache that did not shift sides (ie, hemicrania). [2]

CPH falls under the Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias (TACs); it accounts for about 3%–8% of TACs and is much less common than cluster headache (CH). [3] (See Presentation.)

The short-lasting primary headache syndromes may be divided into (1) headaches with autonomic activation and (2) headaches without autonomic activation. Headaches with autonomic activation include chronic and episodic paroxysmal hemicrania, CH, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT syndrome). (See Etiology and DDx.)


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