What is the role of malignancy in the pathophysiology of thrombophlebitis?

Updated: Aug 31, 2020
  • Author: Padma Chitnavis, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
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Answer

Hypercoagulability occurs in association with a number of malignancies, with the classic example being Trousseau syndrome—a thrombotic event occurring prior to an occult malignancy, usually a mucin-producing visceral carcinoma. The pathophysiology of malignancy-related thrombosis is poorly understood, but tissue factor, tumor-associated cysteine proteinase, circulating mucin molecules, and tumor hypoxemia have all been implicated as causative factors. [75] Symptoms suggestive of malignancy should be investigated in individuals without other known risk factors for thrombosis.


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