What is the role of lower-extremity microcirculation in the pathogenesis of stasis dermatitis?

Updated: Mar 27, 2020
  • Author: Scott L Flugman, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
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Answer

Subsequent research focused on the role of lower-extremity microcirculation in the pathogenesis of skin damage due to venous insufficiency. In the 1970s and 1980s, increased venous hydrostatic pressure was found to be transmitted to the dermal microcirculation. This rise in pressure leads to increased permeability of dermal capillaries.

This increased permeability enables macromolecules, such as fibrinogen, to leak out into the pericapillary tissue; then, polymerization of fibrinogen to fibrin results in the formation of a fibrin cuff around dermal capillaries. It has been hypothesized that this fibrin cuff serves as a barrier to oxygen diffusion, with resulting tissue hypoxia and cell damage.


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