Which medications in the drug class Antibiotics, Other are used in the treatment of Cheilitis Granulomatosa?

Updated: Jun 21, 2018
  • Author: Alan Snyder; Chief Editor: William D James, MD  more...
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Answer

Antibiotics, Other

Therapy must be comprehensive and should cover all likely pathogens in the clinical setting.

Azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax)

Azithromycin inhibits bacterial growth by binding to the 50S subunit of bacterial ribosome, preventing assembly of the ribosome complex and inhibiting translation during protein synthesis.

Clofazimine (Lamprene)

Clofazimine inhibits mycobacterial growth, binding preferentially to mycobacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). It has antimicrobial properties, but the mechanism of action is unknown.

Dapsone

Dapsone is bactericidal and bacteriostatic against mycobacteria. Its mechanism of action is similar to that of sulfonamides in which competitive antagonists of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) prevent the formation of folic acid, inhibiting bacterial growth.

Metronidazole (Flagyl, Flagyl ER, Flagyl IV RTU)

Metronidazole is used to treat a number of microbial infections, exerting is greatest effects in reducing cellular environments. Reduction of its nitro group results in the creation of cytotoxic intermediates that inhibit deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis.

Penicillin G (Pfizerpen)

Penicillin G interferes with the synthesis of cell wall mucopeptide during active multiplication, resulting in bactericidal activity against susceptible microorganisms.

Doxycycline (Doryx, Adoxa, Ocudox, Vibramycin, Oraxyl)

Doxycycline is a broad-spectrum, synthetically derived bacteriostatic antibiotic in the tetracycline class. It is almost completely absorbed, concentrates in bile, and is excreted in urine and feces as a biologically active metabolite in high concentrations.

Doxycycline inhibits protein synthesis and, thus, bacterial growth by binding to 30S and possibly the 50S ribosomal subunits of susceptible bacteria. It may block dissociation of peptidyl t-RNA from ribosomes, causing RNA-dependent protein synthesis to arrest.

Erythromycin (E.E.S., Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, PCE, EryPed)

Erythromycin covers most potential etiologic agents, including Mycoplasma species. The oral regimen may be insufficient to adequately treat Legionella species, and this agent is less active against Haemophilus influenzae. Although the standard course of treatment is 10 days, treatment until the patient has been afebrile for 3-5 days seems a more rational approach. Erythromycin therapy may result in GI upset, causing some clinicians to prescribe an alternative macrolide or change to a thrice-daily dosing.

Erythromycin is a macrolide that inhibits bacterial growth, possibly by blocking dissociation of peptidyl t-RNA from ribosomes, causing RNA-dependent protein synthesis to arrest.


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