Drugs, money, and glory: Is cancer beating cardiovascular disease?

Heart disease still tops the charts as the number-one killer in most developed countries, while cancer deaths occupy the number-two position. But a close look at the numbers shows that cancer has had more new drugs approved in recent years than has heart disease, with even more novel therapies moving through the R&D pipeline. Some experts point to the vastly larger funding coffers cancer researchers have at their disposal, but other, less tangible public forces are also likely driving some of the disparities.

Part 3: Glory—Is cancer beating cardiovascular disease?
Asked what disease they fear most, people overwhelmingly list cancer over heart disease. In the last of a three-part series, heartwire looks at how much public support, fundraising, and volunteerism the two diseases have garnered in recent years and whether cancer's long stint in the limelight may be what's boosting research opportunities and new therapies as CVD lags behind.

Part 2: Money—Is cancer beating cardiovascular disease?
Heart disease is the number-one killer in most of the Western world, followed closely by cancer. But a close look at just how much money is available to support research in both fields points to some striking disparities.

Drugs, money, and glory: Is cancer beating cardiovascular disease? Part 1
Heart disease is the number-one killer in most of the Western world, followed closely by cancer. But a close look at recent drug approvals and pipeline projects speaks to an explosion of new treatments for killer number two, while heart-disease treatments fall behind.